Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Goat Girls Gone Wild - hopefully

Well, the buck rag wasn’t the Easy Heat Indicator we’d hoped it would be. There were days when one or both goats would be acting more aggressive than normal and loud, but they’d only sniff at it. Friday we had yet a couple more indications, but sadly, our buck owner was out of town. She’d offered to let the girls board at their place for a month, and we’d considered that. “Like a visit to the spa”, I mused to Sophia. “Well, no, I guess you don’t go to a spa to meet a guy, do you . . . how about one of those Florida spring breaks you hear about? Goat Girls Gone Wild?” Sophia snorted and answered, “Yeah, except you’re glad that they come home pregnant”. Oh. Yeah.

So when the buck owner came home Sunday night, we took the two out to their farm hoping that we could come home with them, but no . . . the magic didn’t happen. So Selkie and Sarabi are staying there for a month unless there’s an observed . . . uhm, event. The buck owners are super nice, and their goats look so well cared for.

Sarabi, Selkie, and SummerStorm in the “honeymoon suite”:

CAM00075

SummerStorm struck us as a quiet gentlemanly buck. Didn’t chase them around, just waggled his upper lip at them. Our goats took right away to the hay offered in the new accommodations (you never know – they’ve been picky about hay before) and so, while we miss them, we do feel really comfortable about where they are.

WHOA!!! BREAKING NEWS!!!
Just got an email as I was typing up this post. Sarabi is bred! Whooooeeeee! OK, so I know I’m being an obnoxious first-timer here. Like that first tomato out of your first garden, y’know? It’s always like the person invented tomatoes. “It tastes so different than a store-bought tomato!!” And I’m totally being that way here, I do recognize. Still.

Milk!

Goat babies!

. . . being out in the barn at 3 am on her due date, January 18th, but we’re not going to think about that, now ARE we?




5 comments:

Buffybelle said...

Here's wishing you healthy happy babies and lots of milk and recommending some vitamin D for the girls for the months of no sunshine coming up. Regards, Laverne

Kimberly said...

Laverne, excellent point! We do Vitamin D for all of the humans here and I'll make sure to give it to the backyard girls, as well. Especially since they'll be making milk for us! I need to get the "Natural Goat Care" book from the library again and take notes about pregnancy care. They're still at the farm in a pasture with the buck since Selkie hasn't been observed being bred, so I have a little read-up time.

Buffybelle said...

I would recommend researching here at Dairy Goat Info and this is a good run down on managing step by step. Prevention is the theme with goats. http://www.dairygoatinfo.com/index.php?topic=2077.0
Take note of worming at 100 days bred. You don't know what the girls have picked up in the bucks pen.
Also Coccidiosis prevention with kids is a necessity with Corid liquid. Cocci will stunt babies
Laverne

Kimberly said...

Yep, I have that page bookmarked. Also, even before I got goats I had this page in my bookmarks as well: http://cityminiranch.weebly.com/managing-the-goats.html :-)

We got Selkie and Sarabi as bottle babies and did a Cocci routine with dimethox. When we got them tested for CAE/CL/Johnes, we had a fecal done as well, and they were clean, but you're right, they're currently in another pasture with another goat, so I'll incorporate a worming in their maternity care.

Buffybelle said...

It sounds like your goaties are in good hands! That's wonderful. I have neighbors that give terrible goat care so I run an ad, for a goat for sale, on Craigslist with a link to my website so maybe new, or even old, goat owners will see it and be steered to proper goat keeping at DGI. Laverne